Are You a Candidate for a Bone-Sparing Bunionectomy?

You know if you have a bunion. You can’t miss the enlargement of the bone around the base of your big toe. Sometimes a bunion occurs at the base of the little toe and is called a bunionette.

Regardless of where your bunion is, the cause is probably the same. Long-term joint stress causes bunions, and they’re especially prevalent in women, who are more likely to wear, tight, pointed, confining heels. 

Bunions also have a genetic component. If your mom or grandma had bunions, you’re more likely to develop them too. Sometimes bunions result from arthritis, or inflammation of the joint.

Regardless of the reason why you have a bunion, you want relief from the pain, discomfort, and deformity of the condition. When conservative treatments such as specialized comfortable shoes, orthotics, or splints fail to help provide relief, surgery may be in order. 

At the Center for Podiatric Care and Sports Medicine in New York, we evaluate your bunion to determine if surgery is for you. Read on to determine if you should explore this treatment option.

Who should not have bunion surgery?

If your bunion isn’t causing you pain, surgery isn’t really necessary. While early intervention helps prevent progression of many diseases and conditions, this isn’t true for bunions. You can use supportive shoes and other preventive care to slow bunion development successfully and never need surgery.

Who should have bunion surgery?

Good candidates for a bunionectomy, or bunion removal, have significant foot pain. This pain can prevent you from doing the activities you love and even those you don’t really think a lot about, like walking or wearing shoes.

You may also have chronic inflammation of the big toes that can’t be relieved with rest or medications. If you have noticeable toe deformity and see the big toe is moving toward your smaller toes, bunion surgery may also help. 

Stiffness in the big toe that inhibits the ability to straighten and bend is yet another indication. When changes in footwear and over-the-counter medications fail to ease pain, we may suggest surgery to help you find relief.

What is a bunionectomy?

Bunionectomy is a fancy way describe bunion removal surgery. We offer several different approaches to this surgery depending on the severity of your bunion. Because bunions vary in shape and size, there are different surgical procedures to correct them. 

In most cases, bunion surgery involves correcting the alignment of the bone (osteoectomy) and repairing the soft tissues around the big toe. The degree of bone deformity removed and how much shift has to happen varies according to the particular bunion.

Surgery helps shorten loose connective tissues and lengthens the tight ones as well.

At the Center for Podiatric Care and Sports Medicine, we evaluate your bunion and talk with you about the type of surgery that will best correct the toe issue. You’ll find relief from the pain and dysfunction the joint deformity causes. Call one of our two offices or book online to schedule your appointment and evaluation. We work with you to create a viable treatment plan.

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